My Story

Mark Bussell

Mark Bussell, DPT, OCS

I grew up working with my dad who was a physical therapist in a small private practice clinic. After watching him care for patients, I fell in love with the idea of helping people through medicine and decided to follow in his footsteps. After graduating from Loma Linda in 1989, my special needs son was diagnosed with a seizure disorder. 

As a father, I wanted to do everything I could to help him have a normal life, so I researched every option available through manual medicine. I started developing INF™  in South Carolina where I studied alternative manual therapies that claimed to help with diseases traditional therapy could not – like seizures or asthma. I did not agree with their approaches and felt they were only producing intermittent results.

The more I researched, the more I concluded that the microvascular system could be influenced to impact difficult-to-treat neural diseases. I learned that inflammation could remain inside the neural fascicle without a way to drain or force it out, since there was not the presence of lymphatics. Furthermore, I saw the feeder vessels that are usually coiled could be stretched through simple holds, potentially biasing blood flow into neural connective tissue from accompanying arteries. Once I realized this, I used these holds on my family and saw almost immediate improvement in muscle tightness and nerve pain. My oldest son saw improvement with his seizures, due to excellent medical care, decreased inflammation, and lifestyle changes. His EMG studies, which before brought concern, showed significant improvement. 

As I brought the treatment to work, I received dramatic reports from patients. While I was doing very simple manual holds at their feet, designed to bring blood into the nervous system, the patients with chronic pain reported different sensations in the affected areas including warmth, coolness and tingling. I continued to refine the treatment at work until I had my first neuropathy patient in 2007. The patient had severe pain in his feet, but with the treatment his pain went away and he had a “pillow feeling” in his feet. From there, I started to actively recruit neuropathy patients and had continued success in reversing many of their symptoms.

Then, in 2010, my world changed. I was diagnosed with cancer. I underwent surgery and chemotherapy treatment that left me with neuropathy. I self-treated using INF™  and the symptoms were alleviated. I went to my oncologist and requested to treat any chemotherapy induced neuropathy patients she might be working with. She referred a patient to me and, after she was significantly better, the physician requested that I train her staff and continue my research at her university hospital. 

At that time, I received a call to come to Loma Linda University Health with my wife where I presented this innovative treatment to the leadership. They graciously allowed me to introduce this approach on a trial basis. I developed a strong relationship with oncology and started receiving referrals for other patients who had chemotherapy induced neuropathy. After six months and continued success with helping patients with diabetes, trauma, and idiopathic neuropathy, the program was made permanent. From that point on, it has been a blessing to see the program expand and lives change as patients realize what life can be like again without pain or numbness. To have the opportunity to practice at Loma Linda University Health has been a real blessing.  It has been an exciting journey, and I can’t wait to heal other pratients through INF treatment. 


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