Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN)

Chemotherapy Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

What do all those big words have to do with nerve pain? Great question!  

Did You Know?

CIPN is the single greatest limiting factor that keeps cancer patients from receiving their entire medication regimen.

In other words, their nerve pain becomes so unbearable the medication regimen is stopped.

Does this sound familiar? If so, there may be hope.

First, let me explain what CIPN is. It is a disabling side effect to the hands and feet following chemotherapy treatment. The nerve damage in the hands and feet (even arms and legs) is painful and uncomfortable as patients live with the everyday sensation of tingling, numbness and burning. It makes tying your shoe laces seem like an unimaginable task.

The question I have asked over the last few years is, “Can CIPN be prevented with INF™ before the nerve pain starts?”

With INF™ treatment, we look for the beginning stages of nerve inflammation and work to bring blood to those areas through three physical holds.

  • Facilitation Hold
  • Secondary Hold
  • Tertiary Hold

Over the past week I have started treating a CIPN patient who does not have nerve pain, but is at risk. Common symptoms of nerve pain can include:

  • Numbness
  • Weakness
  • Sensitivity to touch

So far there is no onset of nerve pain for this patient. I have treated many CIPN patients with INF ™ and with great success since 2011. As a cancer survivor, myself, there is nothing more rewarding than seeing a patient who had a successful chemotherapy experience also obtain relief from their subsequent nerve pain.

I am looking forward to the new study involving breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and receiving INF™ before CIPN starts. These patients will be tested extensively for physiologic, objective and subjective indicators while we work to prevent the onset of neuropathy or nerve pain.

While chemotherapy is a difficult treatment to endure, it would be so much better to not experience the tingling, burning sensation of nerve pain. The good thing is that day is coming sooner than later!

Share this post