Neuropathic Therapy Center Blog

Genasis Crafton coaching her cheerleading squad.

Genasis Crafton, cheerleading coach for the Apple Valley Rattlers

Cheering to My New-Found Confidence

Of all the things in this world, there is nothing I enjoy more than cheering! It gives me a sense of purpose to motivate and inspire others as they achieve success on and off the field.

The truth is we could all use a cheerleader in our lives at one point or another. Someone to lift us up when we’re down, to help us stay on track when we’ve lost our way and a compassionate friend who never loses hope — even if we have.

I found my friend and cheerleader in Dr. Mark Bussell. He has been on my team since day one.

Older couple riding a bike to stay healthy

5 Ways to Incorporate a Blue Zone Life

What if we could live to be 100 years old?

The idea isn’t far fetch, especially for those living in one of the five designated blue zone areas (Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece; and Loma Linda, California).

Dan Buettner, with the support of National Geographic, traveled across the world to learn why certain populations were outliving others. It came as surprise to many, but there was one city in the United States that proved — a healthy diet, communal spirit, and a day of rest on Sabbath — living to 100 was attainable.

Women stretching in the park

How Pain Affects Women vs. Men

There’s no easy way to say this, so I’m going to jump right in.

Women are more sensitive to pain than men.

Remember, I’m just the messenger.

The truth is women and men respond differently to pain. This should come as no surprise, considering most individuals (young and old or female and male) typically experience varied symptoms, diagnosis and treatments per their conditions.

Older man can't stand on up on his own

4 Unique Types of Diabetic Nerve Pain

Yes, there is more than one!

Nerve pain can affect patients differently when living with diabetes. The signs may be prevalent in some, while others are difficult to diagnose or not that common.

Take a look at the following types of diabetic nerve pain and ask yourself if one of these best relates to your pain symptoms.

Peripheral Neuropathy

This is the most common type of diabetic nerve pain. Peripheral is defined as something that exists on the edge of an area. It’s fitting that it affects the feet, legs, hands and arms.

Woman describing where the pain is to her doctor

How to Describe Your Pain to the Doctor

It’s been said that communication is the foundation to every successful relationship. If we are honest and open, it makes it easier for our loved ones and friends to better understand how we are feeling.

The same can be said about a relationship between a doctor and a patient. Patients are encouraged to express concerns, questions or inquiries toward how they are feeling. How else will we know what is wrong?

There’s no need to be afraid of talking to your doctor when it comes to any level of discomfort or pain. We are here to help!

Tripping over toys on the floor at home

5 Ways to Nerve Pain Proof Your Home

Home is one of the safest places to be, right? It is our homes that provide us with the luxuries of warmth, comfort and security.

The truth is, it can’t always be said for those of us living with chronic nerve pain. Our homes may present more obstacles than solutions to reducing nerve pain.

Doctor discussing medical history with patient

How is Nerve Pain Diagnosed?

Nerve pain affects a growing number of individuals undergoing chemotherapy treatment, living with diabetes or having suffered an injury. An estimated 20 million Americans suffer from peripheral nerve damage, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Nerve damage can cause a tingling, burning sensation in the arms, hands, legs and feet, making it impossible to function on a daily basis.

Man resting and recouping after a long week

5 Ways to Rejuvenate Yourself on Sabbath

Is it just me or have you noticed life seems to be flying by? Every day goes just a little faster as we try to keep up with work, school, and any other event that has us on the go. Even doctor appointments can become a daily chore for those of us living with chronic nerve pain.

But just because everyone else is operating at the speed of fast and faster doesn’t mean we have to. The beauty is we have the time to rest. Though, we need to make it our priority.

Walking off the pain

Walk Off the Pain

If you’re suffering chronic nerve pain in your hands, arms, legs or feet you know all too well the challenges to living a pain-free life. It seems that with each passing day the escalated pain can make the simple activities of cooking a meal for your family absolutely daunting.

So, what can you do to make the tingling, burning or numbness simply go away? Even if just for an hour?

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